NSF Reporting

Transition to Research.gov

NSF requires that all project reports be filed through Research.gov by the PI or Co-PI. Your Research.gov login information is the same as the ID and password you use for FastLane. The last date to submit reports using FastLane was February 1, 2013. 

Please note, only NSF award PIs and Co-PIs can submit reports, due to the requirement that a PI certify the accuracy of each report. Other project personnel, departmental administrators, and OSP are not authorized to submit any NSF report on behalf of the PI.

Report Types:

RPPR Reports – Annual 

Annual NSF progress reports are required in the standardized federal Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR) format. These reports are a communication between the Principal Investigator and the Program Officer. Please note that the Research.gov system will not allow you to skip a required report. If you have an annual report due for an award, you cannot begin the final report until the annual has been reviewed and approved by your Program officer. The annual report is due no later than 90 days prior to the end of the current budget period. If you request a no-cost extension, this will add an additional progress report requirement to your award.

RPPR Reports – Final 

The Final progress report is also submitted in the RPPR format. This report is not cumulative, and replaces the final annual report. This report becomes due on the day the award expires. Please note, once you file a final report, you will not be able to request a no-cost extension. Do not submit a final report if a no-cost extension is anticipated. MIT policy requires that all final reports be submitted within 90 days of the expiration of the award. Please note that it will not appear as overdue in NSF’s systems until 120 days after the expiration date.

NSF Project Outcomes Report

A brief report (2-3 paragraphs) required 90 days after award expiration which is intended for—and viewable by—the general public. This is not reviewed or approved by NSF – it is posted publicly without review shortly after it is submitted. This report becomes due on the day an award expires. This report should also not be submitted if a no-cost extension is anticipated. MIT policy requires that all final reports be submitted within 90 days of the expiration of the award. Please note that it will not appear as overdue in NSF’s systems until 120 days after the expiration date.

Consequences of Overdue Reports

The NSF will send reminders to the PI(s) regarding reports that are due or overdue on a regular basis. While any reporting requirement is overdue, the NSF will not release any incremental funding, new awards, or changes to awards for any award for the PI or Co-PIs. Annual reports become overdue 90 days after the due date. Final reports become overdue 120 days after the due date.

Should any NSF Technical report remain overdue for a period of 6 months, MIT’s Office of Sponsored Programs will follow up with the PI and their department to determine what additional actions are required to resolve the delinquent reports. At 12 months, the matter will be escalated to the Dean.

For more NSF Guidance on the Technical Reporting Requirements, see NSF Memo 16-040 “Meeting NSF’s Technical reporting requirements”, (FAQ dated 1/27/16), and Chapter VII.D of the PAPPG 17-1: “Technical Reporting Requirements”.